FAQ

Frequently Asked Questions


Infertility is due to female problem in 30% of the cases and male problem in 30% of the cases. Problems common to both partners are diagnosed in 15-30% of infertile couples. Unexplained infertility is when cause of infertility is not found and is seen in 10-15 % of couples.

 Female factors are: Ovulatory disorders Damaged fallopian tubes Endometriosis Tuberculosis Uterine abnormality Endocrine abnormality like Hyperprolactinemia.

Fibroids can grow in different parts of the uterus the pear-shaped organ located between the bladder and rectum. The uterine walls are composed of muscle, allowing it to expand enormously during pregnancy. Within the uterus is a central cavity in which the fetus develops.

Pedunculated fibroids are attached to the uterine wall by stalks. Subserosal fibroids extend outward from the uterine wall. Submucosal fibroids expand from the uterine wall into the uterine cavity. Intramural fibroids develop within the uterine wall. These different types of fibroids cause different symptoms. For example, submucosal fibroids typically cause heavy periods. In contrast, subserosal fibroids are more likely to push against the bladder, resulting 3in frequent urination.

Wondering if you’re pregnant? A pregnancy test is the way to know for sure. But what if it’s too soon for accurate results? You may notice some subtle signs of pregnancy—fatigue, nausea, frequent urination, aversions to foods that you normally love, morning sickness, breast swelling and tenderness, and a missed period if you are very regular with menstruation.
The most common symptom of endometriosis is pelvic pain. The pain is often with menstruation, during ovulation, and/or in connection with sexual intercourse. However a woman with endometriosis may also experience pain at other times during her monthly cycle. Another symptoms is infertility, and some women with endometriosis also experience severe fatigue.
Heartburn plagues most expecting women due to a growing uterus and progesterone, a hormone that relaxes muscles (including the stomach valve) to ready the body for pregnancy—both allowing acid into the esophagus. However, you can use certain tricks, such as eating smaller and more frequent meals, taking a walk after meals, keeping the head and chest elevated while you sleep, wearing loose clothing, sipping ginger root tea, and taking antacids to alleviate indigestion and gas.
Doctors and medical researchers do not know what causes fibroids to develop. However, evidence suggests that the female hormones, estrogen and progesterone, can make fibroids grow. During pregnancy, when the hormone levels are high, fibroids tend to increase in size. After menopause, when the hormone levels are low, fibroids stop growing and may become smaller.
No two women with fibroids are alike. The type of treatment will depend on the severity of the symptoms and the fibroid size, number and location. A woman's preference and desire for future childbearing is also considered. There are many effective ways to treat fibroids. However, not all treatments are recommended for all women. For example, some fibroid treatments may not be proven safe for women desiring future childbearing.
Some fibroids grow steadily during the reproductive years, while others stay the same size for many years. All fibroids should stop growing after menopause. Women with fibroids that enlarge after menopause should seek evaluation from their doctor.
Endometriosis is a condition where tissue similar to the lining of the uterus is also found elsewhere in the body, mainly in the abdominal cavity.
World Health Organization (WHO) definition of infertility is failure to conceive following twelve months of unprotected intercourse in absence of any known pathology.
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